Roofing Subbies See Pay Increases Above Construction Average in Past Year

Roofing Pay Trends Graph

SELF-EMPLOYED roofing subcontractor pay rates grew by a massive 1% per month on average during the past year.

Average weekly pay for roofing subcontractors in May 2021 was £698 across England as an average for all ages, according to Hudson Contract, payroll services provider. This compares to this year’s average for May 2022 of £781 – a whopping pay increase of 12% during the past 12 months.

While there was a dip in pay rates in January 2022, to £718, this may have been as a result of the seasonal fluctuations normal in roofing and they quickly recovered after the winter storms of February boosted roofing repair work.

As a monthly change, from April to May 2022, there was a 2.8% rise, as demand for skilled workers continues to outstrip supply and boosts the earnings of roofers.

In comparison, the rate increase for all construction subcontractors showed a slightly larger average rise of 2.9% last month.

12% Average Pay Increase

Regionally, roofing subcontractor pay varies considerably. Unusually, London has given way as the region offering the highest pay rates in roofing, with the North East leading the way paying top dollar at an average of £911. Lowest on the table is Wales, where pay is almost a third less than the top rate.

REGION 3 YEAR AVERAGE WEEKLY PAY
SOUTH EAST £796
LONDON £902
EAST OF ENGLAND £824
EAST MIDLANDS £881
SOUTH WEST £815
WEST MIDLANDS £761
WALES £614
YORKSHIRE & THE HUMBER £701
NORTH WEST £885
NORTH EAST £911

For all construction subcontractors, last month, average earnings amongst construction subcontractors increased in all regions of England and Wales bar the North East. Our best-performing trades were equipment and operator hire (+11.9 per cent), steel and timber frame (+6.1 per cent) and civil engineering (+5.1 per cent).

Cooling Down

Ian Anfield, managing director of Hudson Contract, said: “Earnings for the self-employed increased last month, meaning they are more able than employees to keep pace with the rising cost of living. Even if things level off in the next few months and rate inflation flattens, the self-employed have the options to take on more work or achieve more output to increase their income. In contrast, the directly employed are reliant on annual pay deals negotiated by unions with whom most of them have no membership or relationship with.”

Ian added: “None of our clients are telling us they are struggling for work but quite a few are telling us there are fewer tenders coming through the door. Some larger groundworks contractors are spreading their influence into new regions, particularly with Midlands contractors moving north. It could be a sign that a bit of the heat is coming out of the market in some parts of the country.”

 

>> Read more about roofing pay in the news

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